April 17

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“I’ll Get Back To You” The Truth Is Much More Complicated

By Guru Lwanga

April 17, 2020



WARNING: This article has strong ideologies. You may criticize my work. But not my ideas. You have no right to disagree with me. You can take it or leave it.

Let’s get started.

Have you ever sent a cold pitch? You walk from office to office. Sending CVs and follow ups. You get an interview. You show them your talent. And they say, we’ll get back to you.

Well, the truth is much more complicated. Maybe they mean you aren’t qualified. Maybe they mean you’re black. Maybe they mean you’re over qualified. Maybe they’re just making excuses.

Most of the jobs being advertised have an eligible person. In general, girls are more eligible than boys. Relatives more eligible than strangers. Extroverts more eligible than introverts. And so on. That’s why they tell you to network. Another name for building connections.

As a result, job seekers hop on their prospects' social media. They like things they don’t agree with. They comment on everything they can relate to. Hoping that one day, they’ll get recognized and hired.

Nonsense.

If you’re a job seeker, don’t worry. Life is unfair, you have to make it work to your advantage. Make sure you benefit from the unfair side of life. Don’t just be a loser and keep giving excuses.

A DISADVANTAGE of employers following the conventional hiring process: Their employees lack vision. They don’t understand what the CEO is trying to build. And the CEOs have incompetent employees.

For now, let’s explore a performance-based hiring process. It makes sure you don’t miss a potential genius.

But first, here’s what employers say.

Typical anecdotes.

  • I hire someone with a good CV: Hiring people who’ve won awards and so on. Remember there’s no authentic study showing a linear relationship between a good CV and good performance.
  • I hire someone with experience: No employee has experience doing your kind of job. The world is very dynamic. Think deeply about it. Similar role doesn’t mean the same experience. There are people with 20 years of experience and people with 1 year of experience repeated 20 times. If you go with experience, make sure it’s really 20 years of experience.
  • I’m trying to promote young females in engineering, disabilities, etc: Well, it’s good supporting some form of cause. But don’t expect anything in return. You’re the person helping them. Not them helping you.
  • I hire someone with soft skills: Soft skills won’t get the job done. If I’m a developer, knowing how to code gets the job done. Presentation is a soft skill for a developer. But for a marketer, presentation could be a hard skill. Think of skills as 80/20 rule. Take 20 % of the skills that would result in 80% of performance.
  • I hire someone that can do it all 100%: If you have no idea of what you’re doing, find a partner to compliment your weaknesses. Not an employee.

But if you’re looking for an employee, you can build a dream team following this process.

How To Hire And Fire Software Copywriters

STAGE 1: Connect With The Applicant.

Whether it’s you looking for them or them looking for you, it’s still the connection that matters. You got an unsolicited cold email from an employee? Fine. You run an ad showing an opening? That’s perfectly fine.

STAGE 2: Test Job.

Applicants took their time to express some interest, The next step is to evaluate their experience. Many people skip this step. They judge experience by what they read or hear. Not what they see.

Give a thoughtful assignment. Probably difficult. See who does the assignment with passion. See who doesn’t. Remember to give instructions. They aren’t angels to know what you want.

STAGE 3: Yes - Go To Stage 5.

If you’re happy with the test job...hold on...

STAGE 4: No - Explain Why.

Explain why the candidate didn’t qualify. Show some emotional intelligence. Is it his own fault? Is it the government? The numbers? Don’t say phrases like “this is f*ck up.” That employee could come and buy your company one day. Don’t give false hope.

STAGE 5: Orientation.

Now tell the candidates with good work on your principles. This is your chance to tell them your vision, mission, corporate social responsibility, team, boring legal stuff, and so on.

Employees can read founders like a book. Speak and they’ll know what excites you, and what keeps you awake at night.

STAGE 6: Work.

Time to move to a project management worksheet. The problem of NOT having one is that employees lack feedback. There’s no communication. Projects go months unattended to. Nobody wants to work with robots.

STAGE 7: Firing.

If you happen to fire someone, tell them. Again, show some emotional intelligence. If the contract is over, let your employee leave in peace. Don’t have any emotional attachment to people. People come and go. They’re using your company to advance their careers. They got some greener pastures. Let them leave.

All these stuff is common sense. I haven’t said anything new. But scroll and see how many ads violate these principles.

Sometime back, I was reviewing a job post. Someone wanted someone to create an eCommerce store. Import products. Write ads. Fulfill orders. And so on. I was thinking, if someone can do all that stuff, he’d rather do it himself.

If you’re looking for a job, try to propose a Free test job approach.

If you want to get the job done, judge based on the test job and hard skills.

This is the same process Microsoft and eBay used to hire me. If fortune 500 uses this approach, why don’t you use it?

Wishing you a great dream team,

Your Second Master,

Guru Lwanga.

About the author

Guru Lwanga

Direct Response Copywriting For Software

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